Football history and culture

Blog stories about the rich and exciting history and culture of football.

The Irish Free State Olympic team poses for a group photo, during the 1924 Olympic football tournament 5 June 1924.
The Irish Free State Olympic team poses for a group photo, during the 1924 Olympic football tournament. © Pozzo Archive/FIFA Museum
History and Culture

100 years ago today, on 2 September 1921, the Football Association of Ireland was created at a meeting held at Molesworth Hall in Dublin. But rarely has the founding of an association been achieved in such difficult circumstances.

Young supporters of Team GB at the 2012 Olympics in London.
© Imago
History and Culture

The sight of Great Britain fielding a team in the women’s football tournament at the Tokyo Olympics would have raised a few eyebrows among football fans around the world, so this week we look back at the participation of the United Kingdom in Olympic football and ask - what’s in a name?

The Japanese Women's National Team celebrates their win at the FIFA Women's World Cup Germany 2011 with the World Cup Trophy. © Imago
© Imago
History and Culture

Ten years ago Japan became the first Asian country to win a senior World Cup title at the FIFA Women's World Cup Germany 2011™. We look back on a tournament that was an important milestone in the development of women's football.

USA captain April Heinrichs (R) receiving the USA's 1st place diploma from FIFA President João Havelange (L) after winning the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup in 1991. © Phil Stephens Photography/FIFA Museum
USA captain April Heinrichs (R) receiving the USA's 1st place diploma from FIFA President João Havelange (L) after winning the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup in 1991. © Phil Stephens Photography/FIFA Museum
History and Culture

At the 1908 Olympic Games football tournament in London, the winners received a diploma to honour their success. It was the start of a tradition that persists to this day in the FIFA World Cup.

The US women’s national team celebrating their win at the first FIFA Women’s World Cup in 1991. In the front row we see captain April Heinrichs and future superstar Mia Hamm holding the World Cup Trophy. © Phil Stephens Photography/FIFA Museum
The US women’s national team celebrating their win at the first FIFA Women’s World Cup in 1991. In the front row we see captain April Heinrichs and future superstar Mia Hamm holding the World Cup Trophy. 30 November 1991. © Phil Stephens Photography/FIFA Museum
History and Culture

In this week’s article from the Heritage Team at the FIFA Museum we present a selection of very special objects from April Heinrichs, the first captain of a Women’s World Cup winning team and we explain how a ground-breaking 37-word law made it all possible.

West germany players pose after winning the 1954 FIFA World Cup Switzerland. © Sport Archive/FIFA Museum
West germany players pose after winning the 1954 FIFA World Cup Switzerland. © Sport Archive/FIFA Museum
History and Culture

Nine years on from the end of the Second World War, West Germany was still experiencing the after-effects of the carnage that had engulfed the continent of Europe. Eleven men on a football pitch helped change the national mood.

The Urguayan team on their triumphant lap of honour after defeating Argentina 4-2 in the FIFA World Cup Final at the Estadio Centenario in Montevideo, 30th July 1930.
The Urguayan team on their triumphant lap of honour after defeating Argentina 4-2 in the FIFA World Cup Final at the Estadio Centenario in Montevideo, 30th July 1930. The players shown are (left-right): Jose Leandro Andrade, Lorenzo Fernandez, Jose Nasazzi, Enrique Ballestrero and Pablo Dorado. @ Popperfoto/Getty Images
History and Culture

When Belgian referee John Langenus blew his whistle to end the 1930 World Cup Final, this should have signalled the start of the post-match ceremonies that have followed every Final since. But things were very different at the first World Cup.

© FIFA Museum
© FIFA Museum
History and Culture

On display in The Foundations section at the FIFA Museum is a page from a logbook held in the FIFA archives which contains the results of international matches. Nothing remarkable in that, you might think, but to open the pages of the logbook is to take you on a journey back in time.

History and Culture

In the 29 World Cups played to date there have been 27 title-winning coaches. The member of this elite club about whom football fans perhaps know the least is the very first of them – Alberto Suppici, who at the tender age of 36 led Uruguay to success at the 1930 World Cup.

Cláudia Vasconcelos Guedes (center) with her lineswomen Linda Black (left) and Zuo Xiudi (right) prior to the 3rd place playoff between Sweden and Germany, in Guangzhou, China – 29 November 1991. © Phil Stephens Photography/FIFA Museum
Cláudia Vasconcelos Guedes (center) with her lineswomen Linda Black (left) and Zuo Xiudi (right) prior to the 3rd place playoff between Sweden and Germany, in Guangzhou, China – 29 November 1991. © Phil Stephens Photography/FIFA Museum
History and Culture

On international women’s day, we look back at a landmark moment in the history of refereeing. At the inaugural FIFA Women’s World Cup in 1991, Cláudia Vasconcelos Guedes went down in history as the first female referee to take the lead at a FIFA tournament.

Joseph Bléziri of Stade d'Abidjan (left) passes the ball into the box.
Joseph Bléziri of Stade d'Abidjan (left) passes the ball into the box. © Jacob Adjobi/Mahjoub Archive/FIFA Museum
History and Culture

The second leg of the 1966 CAF African Champions League Final was played on Christmas Day. It proved to be a festive game with one of the all-time great fightbacks in the history of the tournament.

© Phil Cole/Getty Images
History and Culture

Traditionally in Great Britain, the 26th of December, is a day with a lot of football action. Our museum’s football historian Guy Oliver, British himself, explains why.